Luluko - cosplayer, panelist, amateur model, figure collector, Cospix social media minion, Crunchyroll Crunchie, workaholic.

♡ My hope for this blog is to showcase my work and post things that will help other cosplayers! I don't use this account to follow back - sorry!

♡ tagged posts:
- my cosplays
- work in progress
- tutorials
- almost tutorials
- Cosplaying as an Organized Person

♡ social media
- Cospix
- Facebook
- Twitter
- Instagram

♡ upcoming events:
- Comic & Media Expo
- TaiyouCon
Reblogged from marvelentertainment  762 notes

marvelentertainment:

Avengers Ladies! Introducing Lin Cosplay as Carol Danvers’ Ms. Marvel, Lokiloo Cosplay as Kamala Khan’s Ms. Marvel, Gwen A Geek and Her Oven as Nick Fury and Luluko Cosplay as Captain America.

For more costume inspiration, for Halloween, see Marvel’s featured Costoberfest board on Pinterest! http://bit.ly/1ugLM9W

Photos provided by N8E Photo, Judy Stephens, Ben Lam and Oscar Cwajbaum.

If you are interested in participating with Costoberfest, submission deadline is this Sunday, October 19th at 11:50pm PST.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Bittersweet Lulu - hat WIP
Things haven’t been great in Lulu Land for the past couple of weeks, so this was a much needed breakthrough. The hat was the #1 thing that scared me about this project so to have begun to conquer it feels amazing! 
I used Vensy’s tutorial as my starting point - I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read through it. I have trouble thinking in terms of 3D shapes so I’m incredibly grateful she wrote about how she made her Lulu hats.
That being said… I knew I wanted to avoid using her exact method if I could help it. I wanted my hat to be lightweight and easier to transport. I figured Vensy’s way of doing things would work great to help me get the shape I wanted so that I could use that as a form for shaping the final product. 
I started by purchasing heavy gauge plastic coated wire and tried to free-form that around a wig head. Between my incredible lack of sculpting skills and the wire being too thick to manipulate easily, this did not go well. 
Then last night I got the urge to try it again. I had purchased floral wire for my second attempt - it’s much easier to work with and since I’m not using it for the final product, I don’t need it to be super sturdy. After screwing around for a while, I realized that my beloved plastic-wrap-and-tape method could potentially work well here. 
I happened to have a large traffic cone that I purchased to try and help me with a different project - I promise I bought it from Home Depot and didn’t steal it. The base of the cone (not the square base it sits on, but the base of the cone shape) happened to be about the same size as the circumference around my head so I figured it would be a good base to work with.
(Sorry I don’t have any photos of these steps, but they should be pretty easy to understand!) I covered the cone in a large plastic bag - usually I use plastic wrap but I couldn’t find any, and plastic bags work great in a pinch. I then wrapped the floral wire around the cone at 2-3 inch intervals, using masking tape to keep the wire in place. After some more masking tape I pulled the whole thing off the cone, bent it into shape and tried it on. This is what it looked like at that step. As you can tell I was pretty satisfied, so I attached four more wires around the top and bent those into the curl shape at the end. It was a lot easier to free-form this one small part! I covered that in more tape and used small pieces of batting (covered in more more tape) to help fill out the shape. Here’s what it looked like at that point.
I was really happy with what I’d made but still wasn’t sure about how it actually looked on me - I needed to see what it looked like with a brim. I was about to go draft one when I just happened to find a spare witch’s hat brim just laying on my floor. (It wasn’t really a crazy random happenstance - I had taken my Nine hat apart the other night in another attempt to pattern Lulu’s hat.) I taped it on, threw on a wig and that was it. My hat was officially patterned!
Side note - in the art the brim is skinnier, but I like how it looks here. It looks more like a proper witch’s hat and since the Bittersweet skin is Halloween-inspired (without being too Halloween-y) I think the shape works.
So, where do I go from here? I’ll probably add more batting to further smooth out the shape, then my hope is to form Fosshape around this base to create the final product. I’ll probably just buy another cheap witch hat to use for the brim - no need to pattern anything and whatever wire they use in those things is pretty great. Thank goodness all the stores have Halloween stuff!

Bittersweet Lulu - hat WIP

Things haven’t been great in Lulu Land for the past couple of weeks, so this was a much needed breakthrough. The hat was the #1 thing that scared me about this project so to have begun to conquer it feels amazing! 

I used Vensy’s tutorial as my starting point - I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read through it. I have trouble thinking in terms of 3D shapes so I’m incredibly grateful she wrote about how she made her Lulu hats.

That being said… I knew I wanted to avoid using her exact method if I could help it. I wanted my hat to be lightweight and easier to transport. I figured Vensy’s way of doing things would work great to help me get the shape I wanted so that I could use that as a form for shaping the final product. 

I started by purchasing heavy gauge plastic coated wire and tried to free-form that around a wig head. Between my incredible lack of sculpting skills and the wire being too thick to manipulate easily, this did not go well. 

Then last night I got the urge to try it again. I had purchased floral wire for my second attempt - it’s much easier to work with and since I’m not using it for the final product, I don’t need it to be super sturdy. After screwing around for a while, I realized that my beloved plastic-wrap-and-tape method could potentially work well here. 

I happened to have a large traffic cone that I purchased to try and help me with a different project - I promise I bought it from Home Depot and didn’t steal it. The base of the cone (not the square base it sits on, but the base of the cone shape) happened to be about the same size as the circumference around my head so I figured it would be a good base to work with.

(Sorry I don’t have any photos of these steps, but they should be pretty easy to understand!) I covered the cone in a large plastic bag - usually I use plastic wrap but I couldn’t find any, and plastic bags work great in a pinch. I then wrapped the floral wire around the cone at 2-3 inch intervals, using masking tape to keep the wire in place. After some more masking tape I pulled the whole thing off the cone, bent it into shape and tried it on. This is what it looked like at that step. As you can tell I was pretty satisfied, so I attached four more wires around the top and bent those into the curl shape at the end. It was a lot easier to free-form this one small part! I covered that in more tape and used small pieces of batting (covered in more more tape) to help fill out the shape. Here’s what it looked like at that point.

I was really happy with what I’d made but still wasn’t sure about how it actually looked on me - I needed to see what it looked like with a brim. I was about to go draft one when I just happened to find a spare witch’s hat brim just laying on my floor. (It wasn’t really a crazy random happenstance - I had taken my Nine hat apart the other night in another attempt to pattern Lulu’s hat.) I taped it on, threw on a wig and that was it. My hat was officially patterned!

Side note - in the art the brim is skinnier, but I like how it looks here. It looks more like a proper witch’s hat and since the Bittersweet skin is Halloween-inspired (without being too Halloween-y) I think the shape works.

So, where do I go from here? I’ll probably add more batting to further smooth out the shape, then my hope is to form Fosshape around this base to create the final product. I’ll probably just buy another cheap witch hat to use for the brim - no need to pattern anything and whatever wire they use in those things is pretty great. Thank goodness all the stores have Halloween stuff!

Holo - shirt WIP (+ mini tutorial)
Yes, those are coffee filters. Yes, they are there for a reason!
I’m making Holo’s top out of some posh lining scraps I had. As the name implies it’s lovely and soft. But, it’s still lining, so it’s also thin and slippery. I didn’t want to overlock or french the seams inside since they would be really bulky, so I opted to top stitch them instead which would (if done neatly) help reduce wrinkles and puckers along the seams. Also because I like to torture myself, I guess. (This takes away from the “handmade” look I’m going for, in a sense… but it’ll still look good so WHATEVER)
Once I figured out my method, the stitching turned out pretty nice!  As I mentioned, the fabric is slippery and thin so having something to reinforce the fabric was necessary to keep the stitches neat. This is where the coffee filters come in. They work great as a tearaway stabilizer if you don’t want to use interfacing or… actual stabilizer. I cut the filters into four strips then pin them under the seams. (It works a lot better if you pin the strips into place - you just need to pin at the top and bottom, no need to go crazy.)
I realize for some of you this goes without saying, but I am constantly reminded of how many cosplayers are sadly unfamiliar with using an iron, so before you do this you absolutely must press your seams open! Here is a detailed post on how to do this and why. If you aren’t already in the habit of doing this you’ll be amazed at how much better your costumes will look!
Anyway, I lined up my seam with the left side of the square hole on my presser foot (I looked it up and I didn’t see a technical name for this OKAY! the third picture should help you see what I mean). When stitching something like this, I prefer to line up my presser foot this way. You can better maintain control over where the stitches go than if you line up the seam against the outer edge of the foot. Sorry I can’t explain this too well!
When stitching, go slower than you normally might so you can stay in control and keep your lines as straight as possible. If your machine has speeds or a half-speed option, use that to your advantage. On my test stitches I used my machine that has multiple speeds and went very slowly, but had better results when I used my machine that only has half speed (which is still pretty fast). Do some tests and find what works for you!
When you’re done, just tear off the coffee filter bits and maybe iron the seams once more. I promise this works and that I didn’t just take a picture of the one place where it looked good, okay.
If this didn’t make sense/you have further questions/you want to tell me I’m rad my ask box is always open! (Though Tumblr doesn’t always tell me when I have messages, boo.)

Holo - shirt WIP (+ mini tutorial)

Yes, those are coffee filters. Yes, they are there for a reason!

I’m making Holo’s top out of some posh lining scraps I had. As the name implies it’s lovely and soft. But, it’s still lining, so it’s also thin and slippery. I didn’t want to overlock or french the seams inside since they would be really bulky, so I opted to top stitch them instead which would (if done neatly) help reduce wrinkles and puckers along the seams. Also because I like to torture myself, I guess. (This takes away from the “handmade” look I’m going for, in a sense… but it’ll still look good so WHATEVER)

Once I figured out my method, the stitching turned out pretty nice!  As I mentioned, the fabric is slippery and thin so having something to reinforce the fabric was necessary to keep the stitches neat. This is where the coffee filters come in. They work great as a tearaway stabilizer if you don’t want to use interfacing or… actual stabilizer. I cut the filters into four strips then pin them under the seams. (It works a lot better if you pin the strips into place - you just need to pin at the top and bottom, no need to go crazy.)

I realize for some of you this goes without saying, but I am constantly reminded of how many cosplayers are sadly unfamiliar with using an iron, so before you do this you absolutely must press your seams open! Here is a detailed post on how to do this and why. If you aren’t already in the habit of doing this you’ll be amazed at how much better your costumes will look!

Anyway, I lined up my seam with the left side of the square hole on my presser foot (I looked it up and I didn’t see a technical name for this OKAY! the third picture should help you see what I mean). When stitching something like this, I prefer to line up my presser foot this way. You can better maintain control over where the stitches go than if you line up the seam against the outer edge of the foot. Sorry I can’t explain this too well!

When stitching, go slower than you normally might so you can stay in control and keep your lines as straight as possible. If your machine has speeds or a half-speed option, use that to your advantage. On my test stitches I used my machine that has multiple speeds and went very slowly, but had better results when I used my machine that only has half speed (which is still pretty fast). Do some tests and find what works for you!

When you’re done, just tear off the coffee filter bits and maybe iron the seams once more. I promise this works and that I didn’t just take a picture of the one place where it looked good, okay.

If this didn’t make sense/you have further questions/you want to tell me I’m rad my ask box is always open! (Though Tumblr doesn’t always tell me when I have messages, boo.)

Holo - WIP
So I have a pretty good chance of shooting in a lovely area full of real trees and maybe snow before the year is over, something I’ve wanted to do forever. Yet I somehow could not decide what costume to make for this occasion - I had plenty of ideas but none of them really feasible in the amount of time I have.
Then I remembered that I started this almost a year ago and ended up having to put it off. I would have loved something with a weapon and maybe some armor, but I’ve wanted to cosplay Holo for years, and I already have all the materials I need (minus one or two small things). So, this is a good opportunity to fulfill a dream while spending only a little bit on materials. 
Part of the reason it has taken me so long to cosplay my wolfy waifu is because I didn’t like any of her outfits that much - but then I found this illustration from what I presume is an artbook. Not only is it a cute design, but I am 99.999% convinced it is a parody of the outfit C.C. wears in the last episode of Code Geass, which, if you don’t know, is my favorite anime of all time. It was meant to be, really.
As you can see the colors I’m using are not exact - I felt the skirt colors looked too Christmasy, so I opted for earthier tones. I’m doing my best to use more “rustic” looking fabrics that are still pretty - befitting of a goddess of the harvest.
Here’s what’s going on so far - prepare for TL;DR!
- Red skirt: Made with cotton, lined with muslin with ruffles also made of muslin. The ruffles were done with elastic thread, way easier than hand-gathering and cheaper than a ruffler foot! I used this tutorial which is actually for making shirring, but the application is the same and it’s very easy.
- Green skirt: Also made with cotton but it has a little more texture than the red. The final skirt is actually longer than the one in the photo. I’m hand-sewing the entire hem. I think a machine-stitched hem would kind of ruin the fantasy of being a character from a less-industrial time period, even if it wouldn’t be entirely noticeable. But I’m also still bitter about my teacher in the one sewing class I took years ago actually laughing at me after I showed him a hand-stitched hem, so I’d like to at least prove to myself that I can do nice hand-stitching. Plus it’s kind of nice to have something you can work on for cosplay while laying in bed watching Game Grumps just saying.
- Waist cincher: It’s actually on backwards in this photo, the front isn’t complete so it would have looked silly. Made from a lovely black microsuede and patterned by me using the duct tape/Saran wrap method. There is a layer of twill inside for structure as well as steel cable ties in place of boning. Yes, steel cable ties. I had heard of using zip ties in place of boning before, so I investigated this while I still worked at Home Depot last year. I saw the steel ties and decided I would rather try those over plastic. I don’t know how much cinching they’ll provide in the end (and I’m not too concerned about it for this costume) but they do provide nice structure. It’s lined with polyester lining, purely because I had a shit ton of it left over from Sheryl in that exact color. I still haven’t quite figured out how the lacing will work oops.
Because I’m sure you’ve all stopped reading at this point I’ll talk about the top later once I’ve actually made more of it. :P

Holo - WIP

So I have a pretty good chance of shooting in a lovely area full of real trees and maybe snow before the year is over, something I’ve wanted to do forever. Yet I somehow could not decide what costume to make for this occasion - I had plenty of ideas but none of them really feasible in the amount of time I have.

Then I remembered that I started this almost a year ago and ended up having to put it off. I would have loved something with a weapon and maybe some armor, but I’ve wanted to cosplay Holo for years, and I already have all the materials I need (minus one or two small things). So, this is a good opportunity to fulfill a dream while spending only a little bit on materials. 

Part of the reason it has taken me so long to cosplay my wolfy waifu is because I didn’t like any of her outfits that much - but then I found this illustration from what I presume is an artbook. Not only is it a cute design, but I am 99.999% convinced it is a parody of the outfit C.C. wears in the last episode of Code Geass, which, if you don’t know, is my favorite anime of all time. It was meant to be, really.

As you can see the colors I’m using are not exact - I felt the skirt colors looked too Christmasy, so I opted for earthier tones. I’m doing my best to use more “rustic” looking fabrics that are still pretty - befitting of a goddess of the harvest.

Here’s what’s going on so far - prepare for TL;DR!

- Red skirt: Made with cotton, lined with muslin with ruffles also made of muslin. The ruffles were done with elastic thread, way easier than hand-gathering and cheaper than a ruffler foot! I used this tutorial which is actually for making shirring, but the application is the same and it’s very easy.

- Green skirt: Also made with cotton but it has a little more texture than the red. The final skirt is actually longer than the one in the photo. I’m hand-sewing the entire hem. I think a machine-stitched hem would kind of ruin the fantasy of being a character from a less-industrial time period, even if it wouldn’t be entirely noticeable. But I’m also still bitter about my teacher in the one sewing class I took years ago actually laughing at me after I showed him a hand-stitched hem, so I’d like to at least prove to myself that I can do nice hand-stitching. Plus it’s kind of nice to have something you can work on for cosplay while laying in bed watching Game Grumps just saying.

- Waist cincher: It’s actually on backwards in this photo, the front isn’t complete so it would have looked silly. Made from a lovely black microsuede and patterned by me using the duct tape/Saran wrap method. There is a layer of twill inside for structure as well as steel cable ties in place of boning. Yes, steel cable ties. I had heard of using zip ties in place of boning before, so I investigated this while I still worked at Home Depot last year. I saw the steel ties and decided I would rather try those over plastic. I don’t know how much cinching they’ll provide in the end (and I’m not too concerned about it for this costume) but they do provide nice structure. It’s lined with polyester lining, purely because I had a shit ton of it left over from Sheryl in that exact color. I still haven’t quite figured out how the lacing will work oops.

Because I’m sure you’ve all stopped reading at this point I’ll talk about the top later once I’ve actually made more of it. :P

Bittersweet Lulu - hat WIP
Between nine years in orchestra and working retail through most of my school years, I’ve started to become rather annoyed when Christmas stuff starts popping up any earlier than November. 
Some of you frequent cosplay supply shoppers might have noticed that Michaels put up their Christmas stuff last month. As in AUGUST. At first I was disgusted, but that quickly turned into crafter bliss.
See, I had decided months ago that I wanted to use those plastic fillable ornaments for the candy decorations on Lulu’s hat, but you can’t find them really anywhere unless it’s Christmas time (or August, apparently). I hemmed and hawed about ordering some from Amazon but they were more expensive than I wanted. Then Michaels started carrying them absurdly early, at 99 cents for two ornaments, and then put them on sale for 25% off. 
Anyway, you don’t care about that. All I did here was paint the insides with acrylic paints. Bless the Panty and Stocking cosplayers for figuring out this trick years ago. I used a dry-erase marker on the outside to mark out the designs, then painted along those lines with a thin brush and a shaky hand. I think they turned out okay! I’ve been having fun making each one a little different from the next while still staying in the pink/orange color scheme. I could easily and happily make tons of these, but I am still deciding how to tackle making my hat so I’m not sure how many of them I’ll need in the end.

Bittersweet Lulu - hat WIP

Between nine years in orchestra and working retail through most of my school years, I’ve started to become rather annoyed when Christmas stuff starts popping up any earlier than November. 

Some of you frequent cosplay supply shoppers might have noticed that Michaels put up their Christmas stuff last month. As in AUGUST. At first I was disgusted, but that quickly turned into crafter bliss.

See, I had decided months ago that I wanted to use those plastic fillable ornaments for the candy decorations on Lulu’s hat, but you can’t find them really anywhere unless it’s Christmas time (or August, apparently). I hemmed and hawed about ordering some from Amazon but they were more expensive than I wanted. Then Michaels started carrying them absurdly early, at 99 cents for two ornaments, and then put them on sale for 25% off. 

Anyway, you don’t care about that. All I did here was paint the insides with acrylic paints. Bless the Panty and Stocking cosplayers for figuring out this trick years ago. I used a dry-erase marker on the outside to mark out the designs, then painted along those lines with a thin brush and a shaky hand. I think they turned out okay! I’ve been having fun making each one a little different from the next while still staying in the pink/orange color scheme. I could easily and happily make tons of these, but I am still deciding how to tackle making my hat so I’m not sure how many of them I’ll need in the end.

Reblogged from fattogami  1,889 notes

how to sew a sailor uniform : part 1, sewing the top

fattogami:

*IMPORTANT* If you got here from Google, thanks for reading! I hope this tutorial helps you. If you have any questions regarding this tutorial, please read my FAQ page first before sending me any questions. Half the time you’ll find the answer to your question faster than if you wait for my response. Thanks!

» MATERIALS GUIDE «

BONUS POST: How to draft the collar/facing

Hi! Some lovely anons asked me how I make my sailor uniforms for my DR costumes, so I decided to finally make a post about it! For reference, I use patterns from two Japanese sewing books: Cosmode’s 仮想衣装 and すぐに作れるcos衣装. The latter has a fitted seifuku pattern that I use for all of my Danganronpa costumes in order to achieve the flared effect around the hips! I pattern my own pleated skirts, which I’ll explain in the next post.

!IMPORTANT! Before you ask me where to buy these books, read this post about Japanese patterns! They’re not beginner friendly at all and I can’t recommend them to anyone who isn’t reasonably advanced at sewing, so buy at your own risk!

I can’t promise I’ll be able to explain everything relevant since I’m assuming basic sewing and pattern knowledge in order to keep this as brief as possible, so please send me an ask if you have any further questions! If you have any character-specific questions, feel free to send me an ask as well!

Also, as a fair warning, I use a fair amount of tools that people might not have on hand, such as a rotary cutter. I include suggestions on how to get the same outcome without those tools, but I can’t promise it’ll be as neat or look the same. 

how to sew a sailor uniform top with a side zipper

Read More

awesome seifuku tutorial that will also teach you how to draft a facing (which makes attaching collars easier with a prettier result). even if you can’t use the exact same patterns there’s a lot to learn from this!

Tumblr, I am so mad at you!
I received a notification that I had an ask this morning, then opened my inbox that I had several built up over the past few months!
My sincerest apology if you sent me an ask and didn’t hear back until now - I promise you I literally did not know about it until today. :( I feel so bad because all of them were really sweet and I promise I did not mean to ignore all of you lovely people!
Cospix.net actually has a neat ask function, so you are welcome to leave me questions there as I check it every day. I also check Facebook and Twitter more times than is probably healthy for a person.

Tumblr, I am so mad at you!

I received a notification that I had an ask this morning, then opened my inbox that I had several built up over the past few months!

My sincerest apology if you sent me an ask and didn’t hear back until now - I promise you I literally did not know about it until today. :( I feel so bad because all of them were really sweet and I promise I did not mean to ignore all of you lovely people!

Cospix.net actually has a neat ask function, so you are welcome to leave me questions there as I check it every day. I also check Facebook and Twitter more times than is probably healthy for a person.

Bittersweet Lulu - bracelets complete!
So not the most impressive progress, but I’m mostly sharing this because a) simple as they are I love how these turned out and b) I think my method for painting them was pretty imaginative and I thought I’d share.
(I know I yoinked the idea of using skewers from someone else but I don’t remember who. I read it somewhere a long time ago.)
Anyway, first you obviously need skewers! Start by folding a strip of painter’s tape at the bottom of the skewer - it doesn’t have to be painter’s tape necessarily, masking tape would work just as well. The tape not only keeps the beads in place, but also doubles as a handle of sorts so you can get a grip on the whole skewer while painting. Put a strip of painter’s tape between each bead, making sure to leave a little extra room for the bead to slide around so you can better maneuver the paint brush around it. Poke the skewer into a block of foam while the paint dries. If you have multiple skewers, try to place them so that the whole thing doesn’t tip over when you take one skewer out. The foam will also keep everything in place if you’re spray painting, just be sure to seal the foam first. (I was going to use a clear coat on these, but the dull shine was more chocolate-like, so I left them as is.) I imagine this would also be helpful if you needed to use foam balls to make larger beads, which would require filling/sealing in addition to painting. Plus the skewers would poke holes in them for you too. 
So yeah… a pretty simple tutorial… barely a real tutorial… but this made painting almost effortless so I thought I’d share my method!

Bittersweet Lulu - bracelets complete!

So not the most impressive progress, but I’m mostly sharing this because a) simple as they are I love how these turned out and b) I think my method for painting them was pretty imaginative and I thought I’d share.

(I know I yoinked the idea of using skewers from someone else but I don’t remember who. I read it somewhere a long time ago.)

Anyway, first you obviously need skewers! Start by folding a strip of painter’s tape at the bottom of the skewer - it doesn’t have to be painter’s tape necessarily, masking tape would work just as well. The tape not only keeps the beads in place, but also doubles as a handle of sorts so you can get a grip on the whole skewer while painting. Put a strip of painter’s tape between each bead, making sure to leave a little extra room for the bead to slide around so you can better maneuver the paint brush around it. Poke the skewer into a block of foam while the paint dries. If you have multiple skewers, try to place them so that the whole thing doesn’t tip over when you take one skewer out. The foam will also keep everything in place if you’re spray painting, just be sure to seal the foam first. (I was going to use a clear coat on these, but the dull shine was more chocolate-like, so I left them as is.) I imagine this would also be helpful if you needed to use foam balls to make larger beads, which would require filling/sealing in addition to painting. Plus the skewers would poke holes in them for you too. 

So yeah… a pretty simple tutorial… barely a real tutorial… but this made painting almost effortless so I thought I’d share my method!